Apple Galette

The simplicity of a free-form, open-faced, no-tin pie called a galette makes for the sweetest, easiest dessert to pull together with leftover dough and a few apples. I grew up making these with whatever fruit we had in the kitchen, from apples to the peaches or pears that were a bit too firm to eat alone. All you need to make this sheet pan pie is a large bowl, your hands, a rolling pin (or, let’s be real, a wine bottle) and a cookie sheet. Here are a few tips for galette success:

  1. Use really cold butter for maximum flakiness.
  2. Cook your fruit first! Crust this thin bakes up quickly and faster than the fruit can cook thoroughly.
  3. Roll the dough out nice and thin- you don’t want any undercooked chunks of dough.
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Ingredients

Apple Galette

8 ounces (2 sticks) Cold butter
1-3/4 cups All purpose flour
1/2 cup Rye flour
2 tsps Sugar
1 tsp Salt
1/3 cup (maybe a little more) Ice water
4-5 Apples
1/4 cup Sugar
1 Tbsp Butter
3 or 4 Turns of a pepper mill (or a pinch of ground black pepper)
1 Tbsp Milk
2 tsps Sugar

Directions

  1. Place the flours, salt and sugar in a large bowl. Cube your cold butter and toss the pieces into your flours.
  2. Take the cold piece of butter and rub them into flat flakes between your thumb and index and middle fingers. You're looking to smash the butter into cold, flat flakes of butter coated in flour.
  3. Once all the butter piece have been flaked into pieces about the size of your pinky nail, add in the cold water. Add the water a couple of tablespoons at a time, tossing the water in with your open hands, until you can squeeze the dough lightly and have the dough just barely hold together.
  4. Dump the dough onto your table (with a touch of flour) and with a flat, open hand, slap it into a rectangle. You don't want any of this to look to pretty! A shaggy mess is ok. Fold the dough into thirds as though you were folding a piece of paper into an envelope.
  5. Wrap the dough loosely in plastic wrap or parchment, then roll it flat with a rolling pin. Chill for 1 hour in the fridge or 30 minutes in the freezer (or weeks in the freezer, if you're into doing things ahead of time).
  6. Cut your apples around the core. Slice into thin slices (about eighths). Grab a large skillet and melt the sugar until it reaches a lovely golden color (avoid stirring the sugar, just watch the pan). Turn off the heat and add the butter, stirring until it is melted.
  7. Add your apples to the skillet, cooking these down, tossing occasionally, until they take on a touch of the caramel color. Add the pepper. Set the apples aside in a separate plate to cool. Preheat the oven to 375F.
  8. Roll out the dough as thin as you can. Place on a parchment-paper lined cookie sheet. Arrange your apples in a spiral over the center of the dough. Fold the outside sides of the dough over a touch of the apples. Brush with a little milk, then sprinkle with some coarse sugar.
  9. Bake until golden on the edges.